Used to and use to

Here is an English lesson on how and when to use “used to” and “use to”:

“Used to” and “use to” are both verb phrases that are used to describe a past habit or state. However, they are used slightly differently and have different grammatical rules.

“Used to” is the more widely accepted and preferred form for describing a past habit or state that no longer exists. It is followed by the infinitive form of the verb, without “to.” For example:

  • “I used to play the piano when I was younger.”
  • “She used to work at a bank before she became a teacher.”

“Used to” is always used with the past simple tense. It cannot be used with other verb tenses.

“Use to” is a less common form that can also be used to describe a past habit or state that no longer exists. It typically occurs with the auxiliary verb “did” and is used to ask about a past habit or state. For example:

  • “Did you use to work there?”
  • “Did it use to be like that?”

“Use to” can also be used without “did” to describe a past habit or state that no longer exists. For example:

  • “It didn’t use to be like that.”

It’s important to note that “use to” is not as widely accepted as “used to” and may not be recognized as correct by all speakers of English. Therefore, it is generally best to use “used to” when describing a past habit or state that no longer exists.

In summary, “used to” is the preferred and more widely accepted form for describing a past habit or state that no longer exists. It is followed by the infinitive form of the verb, without “to,” and is always used with the past simple tense. “Use to” can also be used to describe a past habit or state that no longer exists, but it is less common and may not be recognized as correct by all speakers of English. It is typically used with the auxiliary verb “did” or without “did” to describe a past habit or state that no longer exists.

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